piektdiena, decembris 07, 2007

The only way to keep growing--as a person and as a company--is to keep expanding the boundaries of what you're good at.

J.Spolsky

ceturtdiena, decembris 06, 2007

Bus Buddies

"The Bus Buddies are part of the fastest-growing group of work travelers in the country, people who rarely see their houses in daylight, leave home when their kids are still asleep, and mainline Red Bull just to stay awake. They're known as extreme commuters. They spend at least a month of their lives each year traveling a minimum of an hour-and-a-half to work and back.

This is what economists call "the commuting paradox." Most people travel long distances with the idea that they'll accept the burden for something better, be it a house, salary, or school.

People usually overestimate the value of the things they'll obtain by commuting -- more money, more material goods, more prestige -- and underestimate the benefit of what they are losing: social connections, hobbies, and health... "

-excerpt from a February 25, 2005 BusinessWeek article; authors Michelle Conlin, Lauren Gard and Rob Doyle

http://flickr.com/photos/mariposa_negra/2063099936/

trešdiena, decembris 05, 2007

Anything is possible

Anything is possible, unless it's not.

(šodienas ./ citāts)

otrdiena, decembris 04, 2007

inhouse software

.. New York was the first place I got to see what most computer programmers do for a living. It’s this scary thing called “in house software.” It’s terrifying. You never want to do in house software. You’re a programmer for a big corporation that makes, oh, I don’t know, aluminum cans, and there’s nothing quite available off the shelf which does the exact kind of aluminum can processing that they need, so they have these in-house programmers, or they hire companies like Accenture and IBM to send them overpriced programmers, to write this software. And there are two reasons this is so frightening: one, because it’s not a very fulfilling career if you’re a programmer, for a list of reasons which I’ll enumerate in a moment, but two, it’s frightening because this is what probably 80% of programming jobs are like, and if you’re not very, very careful when you graduate, you might find yourself working on in-house software, by accident, and let me tell you, it can drain the life out of you.


I started to discover that the management philosophy at Juno was old fashioned. The assumption there was that managers exist to tell people what to do. What I was used to from the west coast was an attitude that management is just an annoying, mundane chore someone has to do so that the smart people can get their work done.



http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2007/12/04.html